More African women are beginning to wear their natural hair and this is fast becoming the trend. The natural hair has a great tendency to dry out due to its nature and and the African weather. Dry hair  makes your hair look dull and will eventually break.

Shampooing your hair

In shampooing your hair, ensure you use a shampoo that is enriched in nourishing agents and moisture and will not leave your hair drier.  And when shampooing your hair, ensure you gently massage into your scalp in order to avoid any rough friction that may cause damage to your hair.

Rinsing your Hair

Use lukewarm or completely cold water to rinse your hair as opposed to hot water. Cold will help close the scales on hair’s cuticle and seal in nutrition. It will also give your hair extra shine and smoothness.

Moisturizing your hair

A dry hair is lacking in moisture hence the great need to frequently and deeply moisturize to tame tangles and repair dry hair. When your hair is dehydrated, use a deep treatment at least twice in a week.
For optimal nutrition, leave the cholesterol on hair for a minimum of 5 minutes. You can also wrap your hair in a warm towel while the formula diffuses then rinse off gently. Also apply a leave-in conditioner.

Daily Maintenance of your hair

Use essential oils to daily maintain your. Tie your hair with a silk scarf at night. Also, remember to live a healthy life. Exercise regularly and feed well.

 

We will cut straight to the chase. If you are a Nigerian, you most likely have the 4C natural hair type and even though there is a general misconception about the ‘difficulties’ involved in managing the 4C natural hair type, it really is beautiful and easy to care for as long as you know how to properly clean, moisturize, and maintain it. What is not to love about the 4C natural hair!

Type 4c hair is composed of strands that will almost never clump without the use of styling techniques. It can range from fine, thin, soft to coarse with densely packed strands. Some say Type 4c coils look identical to 4b except that the curls are tightly kinked with less definition. Tighter coily hair can shrink more than 75%.

Although everyone’s hair is unique, getting care and maintenance tips from experts can reduce the stress of finding what works for you.

Quick Tips

  • Use a product range that is specifically made for the 4C type of hair i.e specially made for the Nigerian hair
  • A curl defining custard for twist-outs and braid-outs
  • Cover your hair at night with a silk or satin cap to protect your hair and prevent breakage

Celebrities with 4C hairtype

  • Lupita Nyong’o
  • Omoni Oboli
  • Adesua Etomi
  • Viola Davis
  • Olorisupergal

Stay glued to this page for more tips on how to care for your natural hair.

It is no knowledge that the African natural hair can sometimes be difficult to manage due to the curly nature and volume of this hair type. The good news is that there are simple tips that can help this natural hair journey enjoyable and hassle-free.

Get educated – It is a big wonder how so many women with lustrous natural curls don’t know how to maintain their hair on a daily basis. Rather than hiding behind your wigs, weaves and braids read up on how to treat your natural curls.  Learning a tip or two on how to take care of your natural hair will go a long way in this style journey.

Product Knowledge -You need to know the basics, like the fact that conditioner is a very different product to oil and should not be used in the same way to achieve the same effect. Whereas oil will help to hydrate your scalp, it will do nothing to activate natural curl nor will it help your hair to be softer. You also need to understand the content of a particular product.

Ask the experts – Make the most of social media by asking experts in the field. Who is in a better position to ask than a brand that is specifically for Nigerian Women living in Nigeria.  You can ask directly or run through their feed for tips.

Myths about Natural Hair- Several people make the mistake of thinking that all natural hair needs excessive amounts of oil in order to stay hydrated and moisturized. However, thinking that oil is going to solve your dryness problem is not an accurate way to go about treating your natural hair. Ask the experts in the field they will be able to point you in the direction of products that will be much more beneficial

Dandruff is characterized by flakes and annoying itching. It can be very embarrassing. Apart from the constant scratching of hair in public places, the flakes falling from  your hair can make you appear very untidy and not presentable.

Almost everyone gets dandruff at some point in their lives;  Dandruff can also be described as the shedding of dead skin from the scalp, and is not to be confused with simply a dry scalp.  Dandruff comes in two types – dry and waxy; many people are not aware and either over treat or under treat the condition.  So before you self diagnose whether you have one of these types of dandruff and not just a dry scalp, we will share 3 signs that shows you that you are definitely suffering from dandruff.

  1. Flakes – If you have a whitish, oily-looking flakes of dead skin dotting your hair and shoulders on a constant basis, then you are most likely suffering from dandruff. These flakes of skin range from small and white to large, greasy, and yellow.
  2. Itchy Scalp – Itching is another red flag for dandruff.  Flakes are preceded by itching. Usually, the first symptom of dandruff is itching. The itch sensation happens when receptors on the surface of your skin are triggered by some irritants. Your nerves send a signal to the brain via your spinal cord, which then causes you to scratch your hair. Itching is another red flag for dandruff.
  3. Dryness and Irritation – When you suffer from dandruff, you will have dryness of hair and scalp and many times, the irritation will occur from constant itching on an already dry scalp.

If you are experiencing all three or at least 2 of the above, it is time to treat your dandruff before it starts to embarrass you.

For a dandruff treatment solution that has worked for over 20 years, click here.

Coconut oil is a precious gift of nature made from coconuts. It has a million and one benefit for the body, skin, hair and pretty much anything you can think of. Using coconut for your hair can provide your hair with a lot more good than you can ever imagine.

Moisture retention – Coconut oil has a high moisture retaining capacity which helps the hair retain moisture and also seal in moisture thereby making hair soft and avoiding breakage.

Cooling Effect – Coconut Oil has a cooling effect on both the hair and scalp. It can soothe people with hot heads or those suffering from severe scalp sweating.

Styling – Coconut oil can be a good styling oil as well, as it melts on heating and condensing when cooled. So when you apply it on your hair, it thins and spreads evenly due to the heat on the scalp and as the hair comes in contact with air, the oil on the hair condenses, thus working as a styling gel or cream.

Lice Protection – Lice is a very common pest in the hair and can cause embarrassment for anyone. They also have a tendency to come back again and again. While there are several chemical products that can take care of lice from one’s hair, it can also damage the hair and scalp in the process. Wet hair and apply coconut oil and comb through the hair to get rid of lice. The coconut oil protects the hair from falling off while combing when wet.

Hair care for dry hair and scalp – Coconut oil is a great ingredient to combat dry hair and scalp as it keeps the hair soft and shiny especially dry hair. It can also serve as a great from of hair conditioner.

 

 

Hair is part of what makes you look beautiful. When it break at the ends, it makes your hair appear dull making it appear frayed and frizzy, thin or ragged. If your hair is breaking, it may be the result of frequent hair coloring or perming, heat styling tools like blow dryers and hair straighteners, or swimming in chlorinated water amongst many other things.

Hair Feels Gummy

When healthy hair is wet, it should feel smooth and glossy. When damaged hair that is prone to breakage is wet, it can feel gummy or sticky to the touch. Hair that feels gooey is damaged and may break off. Individuals with sticky-feeling hair should not dye or perm their hair, swim in chlorinated water, or use heated styling products. Sticky, gummy hair will break if much more damage is done.

Hair Gets Tangled Easily

Hair prone to breakage may feel frayed or like straw, and these coarse strands can get tangled more easily than hair that still contains sebum, the natural oil in hair. Although hair may become tangled, brush hair only when it is dry, because hair breaks more easily when it is wet. To avoid hair breakage while brushing or combing your hair, use a moisturizing conditioner after shampooing and spray with a detangler before brushing hair out when it is completely dry.

Hair Elasticity

Hair breakage may occur in hair that’s brittle when dry and stretchy when wet. To determine whether overprocessing has compromised the strength of your hair, pull a piece of hair from your scalp and submerge it in water. After removing it from the water, pull gently on each end of the hair. It will either break, stretch or stay intact. If hair breaks or stretches, it is unhealthy. If the hair stays intact, it is strong and healthy.

Hair Dries Slowly

Hair prone to breakage may not dry as quickly as hair that is healthy, due to lack of protein and and moisture in the hair. Hair will try to retain moisture, making it stay wet longer. Even if your hair takes longer to dry than usual, avoiding blow drying or using heat to prevent it from becoming more damaged. The healthiest way to maintain damaged hair is to avoid styling products and hair color until hair grows out completely.

Hair Flip GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

 

 

 

 

Pregnancy is a beautiful thing, a fascinating mystery in the history of mankind.

Although pregnancy can be such a fulfilling experience, it however comes with its own baggages. Pregnancy can affect hair in many different ways. It will shock you to know that this is often the case during pregnancy  and this can be largely owing to increased stress, hormonal changes and changes in lifestyle when expecting a baby.

In a study conducted with women, 40% of women reported that their hair looks better than ever during pregnancy. In fact they claimed it felt thicker and fuller by their 2nd trimester. Another 30% claimed their hair became more problematic than usual, it became drier and needed extra moisture especially in their 2nd trimester. Others barely noticed any difference.

So this begs the question, could it all be in the mind?

The conclusion is this, Hair changes will be as a result of hormonal changes which varies in each individual and during different pregnancies. Also, the sensitivity of hair follicles to these changes is different. It’s impossible to estimate in advance what these effects will be. Your hair can be great during a first pregnancy and be quite the reverse in the second – or vice versa.

Rest assured though, if you do experience hair issues, it’s very rare for a woman to have problems with her hair all through the 9 months. The last 3 months would normally become better.

FIRST TRIMESTER

Perceived thickness happens because pregnancy immediately increases oestrogen levels and reduces the circulation of androgens (male hormones). This causes your follicles to produce less sebum – oil – and so you get bouncier roots and more body. However, less sebum can also make your hair feel drier, so make sure to moisturize and hydrate your hair.

HAIR BREAKAGE DURING PREGNANCY

In general, very few hairs are shed during pregnancy, so your hair will often be much thicker and fuller towards the middle and end of your pregnancy. This is because raised oestrogen levels keep your hair in the growing (anagen) phase for longer than usual.

However, post-partum hair loss can occur a few months after giving birth due to oestrogen levels dropping back to normal.

HOW TO GET THE BEST OUT OF YOUR HAIR DURING PREGNANCY

A foetus requires a huge amount of energy to grow, and so do your hair cells. However, your body will quite rightly prioritize your baby’s needs over that of your hair. To help keep your hair healthy, make sure you follow a healthy hair regimen. Who says you can’t be fabulous whilst pregnant.

Your hair may appear drier than usual during pregnancy. To combat dryness, treat your hair to a weekly pre-shampoo conditioning treatment such as the 3 step solution, which consists of shampoo, cholesterol, leave-in conditioner and castor oil. This will help regularize your hair and scalp whilst boosting volume and body leaving your hair fabulous during your pregnancy.

For hair breakage not related to pregnancy click here for detailed information.

Establishing a good hair care routine early on will help your child form healthy hair habits. Once children start school, and other siblings potentially arrive, time may become too short for you, but ideally your children’s hair should be washed at least once a week and always after sport – especially swimming.

Children often hate having their hair washed because water and shampoo get into their eyes. However, we’ve found that if you make it into a game, hair washing can be a fun activity. One tried and tested method is to give your child a face cloth to hold over her eyes and ask them to guess where you’re going to touch their head first. Or where the water will be felt – a bit like blind man’s bluff. Use of bath-time toys and stories can also be helpful.

Detangle
Detangle long hair with a wide-tooth comb prior to washing. If you start off with tangles, you’re likely to end up with more. Start near the bottom of your child’s hair and work up to the roots. Do this until the hair can be combed/brushed from root to tip without hitting any tangles. If your child’s hair is exceptionally knotty, you can comb through first with a bit of conditioner or a detangling spray.

Shampooing
Children up to 3 years old should have their hair washed with a baby shampoo or a diluted version of your own shampoo. Thoroughly wet your child’s hair before applying shampoo. This creates good lather and also means less shampoo is needed.
Lather using both hands in a gentle kneading motion, working from forehead to nape. Don’t pile long hair up on top of your child’s head. This can lead to knots and time-consuming and uncomfortable de-tangling later on. Simply allow the lather to run down and rinse thoroughly.

Conditioning
Apply conditioner to the mid-lengths and ends of your child’s hair. A little is all that’s needed. Conditioner should be rinsed out, but your child’s hair should still feel a little slippery afterwards.

Towel Dry
Gently squeeze excess moisture out with a towel – never rub. Rubbing can cause hair breakage and tangles. We suggest you gently comb through with a comb rather than a brush, starting at the tips and working up towards the roots. Wet hair is more vulnerable to damage and combs are gentler on your child’s hair and won’t pull as much.

Dry
Ideally your child’s hair should be left to dry naturally. If you do blow-dry, use a low heat setting and hold the dryer at least 15cm away from their hair. A child’s skin and scalp are very sensitive to heat.

Plait

Plait hair to the desired style. Remember, no tight braids and no forceful pulling of hair.

There you have it! Stay updated by subscribing to our newsletter. Watch out for more tips on how to care for your children’s hair.